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Olive Farming

Olive Farming

Postby hills » 08 Jun 2007, 15:52

I have just purchased an olive grove in Spain, I would appreciate any advice on how to harvest, and on when and how to prune the trees. All advice is welcome, thanks.
hills
 

Re: Olive Farming

Postby Sameer » 27 Jul 2007, 10:09

[quote="hills"]I have just purchased an olive grove in Spain, I would appreciate any advice on how to harvest, and on when and how to prune the trees. All advice is welcome, thanks.[/quote]

I have a house in Amman Jordan and my garden contains about 40 olive trees of various types and ages.
I have never bought olive oil or pickled olives for the last 23 years.
I care for the trees, prune them immediately after harvest and stand on the press day or night and receive my fresh oil in my special containers. The follwoing information is for you and all other olive tree owners.
weekly care ..... just cut away any dried up branches and burn them.
watering....... olive trees are great survivors and they do not need any watering except in the harsh hot summers, once or twice in July/August
during snow ..... if snow is mild do not touch. If snow is heavy just brush off lightly some of the snow.
The tree will flower in spring it is advisable to not to spray any chemicals so that all sorts of insects pass by and touch the flower to germinate.
If you like to spray..... do it once when the flowers turn into large fruit.
In October the friut will have arrived at its best size but like all fruits it is not yet ripe and does not have all they olive oil you are looking for.
Harvesting.... delay you harvest untill all the green olives turn brown and then black,,,, when they are black they are soft and juicy and ready to press.
When the olive is green in October it is hard to harvest and contains 50 % less oil. In November or when it turns black ... It is easy to harvest and contains all the oil you need... 100%
To harvest you need a large size cloth to suround the tree and all its branches laid on the ground.... You need a ladder and soft plastic pipe like the one you use of electric conduit .... with shich you hit the branches that carry the fruit. Do not hit hard and do not try to get all the fruits, so that you do not damage the branches which will carry next years fruits.
Once the fruit and some leaves collect on the cloth under the ladder.... go down and collect the fruit and in large cercular pans .... and lift them in the air and let the wind blow so that the leaves are blown away.
Collect the fruit in 50 kilo bags and let them stand in a cool and moist basement.
When you finish all harvest transport to the press and collect the oil in black 20 kilo/litre and store in a dark store.
Storage......In black plastic containers in dark moist basement, oil will stay fresh for years.
Pruning.... They minute you finish harvest in November ... cut all the dried up branches and remove all conjested branches in the middle.... lit all they leaves see the sun and air. Also cut all branches that are higher than your harvesting capabilities.
First aid..... cover all cut ends of branches with special material which will seal the wound.... every cut in the trunk or on the branches is a wound which should be cared for. either seal it of if it is large and oin the trunk cover it with mud and wrap it lightly with a plastic cover like a human wound.
Every 1000 square meters / about 20 mid size tree would give you an average of 40 litres of oil depending on the type, location and conditions.
Usually Olive trees give their best one year and their worst the other.
If you do not spray, water, prune, or give any care for the olive tree it will still flourish and despite all harsh conditions it will produce for hundreds of years to come.... this is Ideal for the lazy farmer.
In the Arab world we say .... They have grown ( meaning our fathers)
so we ate .....and we grow .....so they will eat ( meaning our children).
My heart bleeds every time I see an Israeli buldozer pluck out an old olive tree grown by my Cannonite fathers.... a tree which has seen genesis.... Moses... Jesus... and Mohamed.
I hope the above will help all olive tree owners all over the world.
Sameer of Jerusalem
Sameer
 

taking care of olive trees in spain

Postby casa tapnalla » 15 Apr 2008, 23:06

Dear Sameer of Jerusalem,
Thank you so much for taking time to share you knowledge of olive farming with us, we recently bought an olive grove in Spain with 96 mature olive trees.
As they have like you say been on our earth for so long, like you my husband and I believe they deserve tender care.
Thank You with kind regards
Patricia from Albacete Spain
casa tapnalla
 

Postby almostphantom » 07 May 2008, 12:50

Wow! I feel for the loss of the trees also..so wasteful. I would like to plant some olive trees, but I'm not sure if they will survive in Virginia, USA. I am on the Coast between the Atlantic Ocean and the Chesapeake Bay.
almostphantom
 
Posts: 2
Joined: 05 May 2008, 09:33
Location: Virginia

Postby Guest » 30 Jul 2008, 07:12

[quote="almostphantom"]Wow! I feel for the loss of the trees also..so wasteful. I would like to plant some olive trees, but I'm not sure if they will survive in Virginia, USA. I am on the Coast between the Atlantic Ocean and the Chesapeake Bay.[/quote]

For all those who live in virginia....I am sorry it is too cold for the olive tree to survive...it is a mediterainian tree ...may be in georgia and florida and the southern states....
However ... my advice to the people of the north is to buy always pure olive oil and use it for your salad...never trust the suppliers and always read the small print on the 3 litre tins when it says it is a blend or pomace...always go to the darker, greener, and with special aroma..but you can never tell just like the pure and the impure honey...nowadays you can never tell if it is honey or a blend of somthing else.
I wish there were tests for the real thing ...
Guest
 

olive trees

Postby encollazo@hotmail.com » 14 Sep 2008, 20:55

:cry: too bad it have to be that way, so much history so much pain, but we can always continue planting more. I have a small olive tree that miracuosly starting growing in my backyard. Now a few years has passed and this year we have little fruits. This is how I got to this site as I was looking for experts words on how to prune some of the branches. Thank you so much for your info and I will pass it on to whom ever will ask for info. Live and prosper
encollazo@hotmail.com
 

Olive Trees in VA

Postby Tiziano » 10 Mar 2009, 13:24

I beg to differ with the Guest who stated that olive trees will not grow in Virginia. I have several trees and not only do they grow, but they fruit. I am in Zone 7, and I know that there is an olive grove with over 20 mature trees in Maryland in Zone 7-A. You must, however, protect your tree from extremely cold temperatures, choose a cold-resistant variety, and plant it in a suitable location. Another option is to bring your potted tree in during the coldest parts of the winter.
Tiziano
 

Olive farming in Mid-west

Postby Djamel » 17 Aug 2009, 08:56

Greetings Tiziano,

You have mentionned the possibility of growing fruitful olive trees in Virginia/Maryland, using cold-resistant strains of olive trees. We have a small property in Northern Virginia, and I have been wondering about that very question. Could you please tell me what trees are more likely to resist our colder weather.

Thank you in advance

Kind regards

Djamel
Djamel
 
Posts: 1
Joined: 17 Aug 2009, 08:51

Postby Macdorm » 27 Aug 2009, 08:17

Collect the fruit in 50 kilo bags and let them stand in a cool and moist basement.
When you finish all harvest transport to the press and collect the oil in black 20 kilo/litre and store in a dark store.
Storage......In black plastic containers in dark moist basement, oil will stay fresh for years.
Pruning.... They minute you finish harvest in November ... cut all the dried up branches and remove all conjested branches in the middle.... lit all they leaves see the sun and air. Also cut all branches that are higher than your harvesting capabilities.
First aid..... cover all cut ends of branches with special material which will seal the wound.... every cut in the trunk or on the branches is a wound which should be cared for. either seal it of if it is large and oin the trunk cover it with mud and wrap it lightly with a plastic cover like a human wound.
Every 1000 square meters / about 20 mid size tree would give you an average of 40 litres of oil depending on the type, location and conditions.
Usually Olive trees give their best one year and their worst the other.
If you do not spray, water, prune, or give any care for the olive tree it will still flourish and despite all harsh conditions it will produce for hundreds of years to come.... this is Ideal for the lazy farmer.
Macdorm
 
Posts: 1
Joined: 27 Aug 2009, 08:07

Re: Olive Farming

Postby California Guest » 03 Sep 2009, 23:22

To Sameer, Many thanks for your informative descritption of the care of olive trees. I AM that "lazy farmer" you mentioned and have been thinking of adding several olive trees to my large California property for a few years. This has inspired me to go ahead and do it!
I also love the connection that we get when we understand what role these wonderfully beautiful trees play in our world. I am saddened that you have watched so many destroyed, but gladdened that you have shared so that more can be begun -- with great hopes for "Feeding our children." Thank You.
California Guest
 

Caring for olive trees

Postby jannan of N. Tuscany » 01 Dec 2009, 09:55

I bought a house in Italy four years ago which included a very neglected olive grove which is in an elevated south facing position. Unfortunately other trees have grown up in between the olives as no husbandry has taken place for at least 20 years. I would dearly love to bring these trees back into production. There is a frantoio for pressing olives across the road from my house. The unwanted trees are to be cut down during this year, giving me the opportunity to access my olive trees and hopefully revive them with a little help from friends. The articles written by various people on your site have been very helpful as I really am a beginner and need easy to understand instructions. Many thanks.

November 2009
jannan of N. Tuscany
 

Postby RoxanneFalcone » 06 Feb 2010, 11:32

Sameer thanks for that amazing little guide. I purchased a house last year in Spain and it came with 25 olive trees and we never knew how to care for them so thanks for your useful guide.
RoxanneFalcone
 
Posts: 1
Joined: 06 Feb 2010, 11:26

growing olive trees

Postby Redsox - New Zealand » 16 Sep 2010, 21:22

I live in New Zealand and have been establishing an olive grove for several years now.
Currently we have planted some 370 trees in 3 varieties ( 2 fruiting & 1 pollinator) all of which are doing well and beginning to produce good quantaties of fruit.
I read with interest the comments by Sameer and the methods they use in that region of the world to produce & harvest olives , of course they have been doing it that way for centuries compared to New Zealands 20 years or so and who am I to argue their methods.
I would however like to share some experiences of our own when it comes to harvesting olives, Sameer comments that once shaken or raked from the tree that they should be stored in bags or sacks in a dark place. There is a danger using this method as the fruit can sweat causing deterioration , best is to get them to a press as soon as you can but if you can't then spread them thinly as possible on a cool dry floor.
It is not advisable to store oil in plastic drums as it will taint the oil , stainless steel is best for storage . Contrary to opinion olive oil does not improve with age and in fact it's quality begins to deteriorate after around 1 year in storage.
Pruning trees is not necessary unless you want a specific shape , many commercial growers just leave them to grow naturally and as Sameer points out , only removing the inward growing wood to promote light into the middle of the tree for fruit ripening.
If you ask 100 people you will probably get 100 opinions and different methods work in different regions of the world.
Olive trees are very hardy and will survive in harsh environments and variable soil conditions , but the one thing they definately do not like is wet feet , it is important that the soil preferably be elevated and free draining.
They are an amazing tree with an ancient and interesting history , I recently visited several groves in Tuscany and was amazed at the amount of fruit still being produced by trees more than a thousand years old.
Ron Whitehead Martinborough New Zealand.
Redsox - New Zealand
 

olive growning

Postby Pauline, Calimesa Ca. » 01 Nov 2010, 21:45

I want to thank you all for your information. I do have a question. It is 01 nov.2010 and my olives are just now changing color. I don't press them but I do collect them for preserving. This is the second year doing so. Last years were ok but I'm lloking for a better way to cure them than using lye. I used salt and citric acid last year. I am looking for a natural cure for my olives. I only have three trees but I treat them as my children. I've had them since they were only 1 foot tall and now stand 15 feet. If anyone has any information. I would be most happy to listen.
Thank You.
Pauline, Calimesa, Ca.
Pauline, Calimesa Ca.
 


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